KCH Graduate Handbook

Department of Kinesiology and Community Health

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Revised August 2015


The commitment of the University of Illinois to the most fundamental principles of academic freedom, equality of opportunity, and human dignity requires that decisions involving students and employees be based on individual merit and be free from various discrimination in all its forms.

It is the policy of the University of Illinois not to engage in discrimination or harassment against any person because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, unfavorable discharge from the military, or status as a disabled veteran or a veteran of the Vietnam era and to comply with all federal and state nondiscrimination, equal opportunity and affirmative action laws, orders, and regulations. This University’s nondiscrimination policy applies to admissions, employment, access to and treatment in the University’s program and activities. Complaints of invidious discrimination prohibited by University policy are to be resolved within existing University procedures.

Every academic institution strives for excellence, according to its own understanding of what the term means. Certainly there are categories of achievement that almost all would agree upon:

  • an institution's rankings in educational surveys
  • the breadth of its programs,
  • the quality of its faculty and students,
  • the placement of its graduates, and the career achievements of its alumni.

In these categories of achievement, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) consistently ranks among the nation's top academic institutions. There are, however, subtler and perhaps even more fundamental indications of quality that relate to the nature of the institution's commitment to its students—commitment that is based on an intimate awareness of what the students themselves require for success and well-being, and not merely what is required of them by an institution. In these categories of achievement, the University of Illinois has also been a leader, often of visionary stature. The UIUC provides an educational environment where creative thinking and personal commitment are respected and encouraged—an environment in which you, as a student, can successfully prepare to meet your highest personal and professional aspirations.

The information in this handbook is for general guidance on matters of interest to faculty, staff and students in the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The handbook summarizes campus/university policies as a convenient reference tool. However, information on campus and university policies contained herein is for informational purposes only and is subject to change without notice. For the most current information, please see the official campus/university versions of these policies as posted on official web sites. These can be accessed through the Campus Policies and Procedures home page at the following url:
http://www.cam.illinois.edu/addrefs.htm

Introduction

Greetings
This Handbook
Graduate Studies
Financial Assistance

Graduate Programs in Kinesiology and Community Health

Satisfactory Progress Toward Degree
Graduate Student Petitions
Research and Human Subjects
Grievance Procedures
Capricious Grading

Graduate Program in Kinesiology

Master's Degrees in Kinesiology
Doctor of Philosophy in Kinesiology
Thesis and Dissertation Preparation
General Plan Of Study Forms And Sample Ms/PhD Programs

Graduate Program in Community Health

Master’s Degrees in Community Health
M.S. in Community Health / Specialization in Health Policy and Administration
M.S. in Community Health / Specialization in Epidemiology and Health Behavior
M.S. in Public Health
M.S. in Rehabilitation

Master of Public Health (MPH)
Doctor of Philosophy in Community Health

Examination and Candidacy Requirements for Doctoral Degrees in Kinesiology and Community Health

Doctoral Candidacy Review requirements

Introduction

 

Greetings

Message from the Department Head

I am delighted to welcome you to the Graduate Program in the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. You are joining a department that is recognized world-wide for its excellence. The breadth and depth of the departmental graduate programs, together with the excellent supporting academic programs offered on campus, will provide a stimulating environment for your studies. Work in graduate school, however, involves more independent study than undergraduate work. Therefore, you are encouraged to explore with skill, persistence, and enthusiasm the many research and scholarly opportunities that our programs provide. Your own efforts, I am sure, will come to contribute to the traditions of excellence in the Department and at the University. I wish you every success in your degree program.

Message from the Associate Head for Graduate Studies

On behalf of the graduate faculty of the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, welcome to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Graduate study is often exciting, challenging and stimulating, but it is demanding and can be frustrating at times. This Handbook has been prepared in order to minimize any procedural difficulties that you may encounter. Please read the Handbook carefully and consult it throughout your studies. You will need to refer to other publications such as the Graduate College Handbook of Policy and Requirements for Students, Faculty and Staff, available on the Graduate College website (http://www.grad.illinois.edu/gradhandbook) and Courses Catalog, Programs of Study, and Course Timetable, which can be obtained online. If at any time you have questions regarding graduate studies and procedures, you are encouraged to discuss them with your advisor and other faculty. If you have any questions about any of the graduate programs, please contact the Department of Kinesiology & Community Health Graduate Office for assistance.

Best wishes for a productive and enjoyable time during your graduate studies here at Illinois.

Steven J. Petruzzello (Dr. P)
Associate Department Head for Graduate Studies
Department of Kinesiology & Community Health, 113 Freer Hall
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
petruzze@illinois.edu

Back to Top

 

This Handbook

This document identifies the academic policies, regulations, and procedures for graduate students in the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health. It is important that you familiarize yourself with this Handbook because it contains most of the answers to questions that will arise about your program. The policies and procedures in the Handbookare based on the following Graduate College and University of Illinois publications:

If discrepancies exist, the Graduate College or University policies take precedence. These publications are available at the website http://www.grad.illinois.edu, or you may request copies from the Graduate College, 204 Coble Hall, 801 South Wright Street, Champaign, IL 61820-6210.

A petition may be filed to request a deviation from these policies and procedures. Petition forms are available in the Department Graduate Office (see section on Petitions in this Handbook). Deviation from policies or procedures stated here or from other applicable regulations must be approved by the Head of the Department or the Dean of the Graduate College as appropriate. It is strongly suggested that you file the petition before the deviation occurs.

The following topics are covered in detail in the The Graduate College Handbook of Policy and Requirements for Students, Faculty and Staff:

  • Credit Loads
  • Credit/No Credit
  • Time Limits
  • Travel for Conferences
  • Travel for Dissertation Research
  • Stipend Payments
  • Payroll Forms
  • Tax Status
  • Health Insurance, Vacation, Sick Leave
  • University Resources for Teaching Assistants
  • Mediation of Conflicts Between Faculty Supervisors and Assistants
  • Resources and Procedures for Grievance Outside the Department
  • Ethics: Academic
  • Professional Codes of Conduct
  • Academic Misconduct Policies (for example, plagiarism, discrimination, sexual harassment).

Knowing the Rules

Responsibility for familiarization with, and adherence to, Departmental and University requirements and regulations rests with the student. Questions concerning interpretation of specific requirements should be directed first to the advisor, then to the Graduate Program Coordinator and, if necessary, to the Associate Head for Graduate Studies.

Back to Top

 

Graduate Studies

Mission Statement of the Department

The Department of Kinesiology and Community Health is an interdisciplinary unit dedicated to the study of health, rehabilitation, and human movement. The advancement and dissemination of knowledge related to health, rehabilitation, and human movement is central to the Department’s mission. Faculty in the Department utilize a broad variety of approaches in the integrative study of health, rehabilitation, and human movement, including research themes such as lifespan physical activity, community health, rehabilitation counseling, disability, well-being and inclusion, physical culture and education, pedagogy, human factors, and human performance.

Department Structure

The Department of Kinesiology and Community Health is organized around five curricular groups:

  • Bio-Behavioral Kinesiology: Faculty in the Bio-Behavioral Kinesiology group examine the antecedents and consequences of involvement in physical activity and sport and the impact that physical activity and sport have upon individuals.
  • Cultural, Pedagogical, & Interpretive Studies: Faculty in the CP&I concentration examine the interaction between physical activity and the individual from a variety of cultural, sociological and pedagogical perspectives. Faculty study the impact of movement on cultural and social relations, whereas others examine issues related to pedagogy and physical education.
  • Exercise Physiology: Exercise physiology is the study of work output, energy transfer, and movement efficiency. Research in this area is conducted in order to better understand the consequences of exercise stress on body systems. The athletic training program focuses on the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries incurred in physical activity and sport.
  • Health Disparity and Disability: Faculty with specializations in health disparity examine a variety of dynamic interactions that impact the overall health of communities. Faculty in rehabilitation examine the impact of disability in the population and the emotional, environmental, vocational, and educational issues surrounding adjustment to disability.
  • Public Health: Faculty in the public health group examine population-based approaches to public health. Translating research into public health practice is a cornerstone of the group focus.

Each group is managed by a coordinator who is responsible for coordination the review of graduate students.

Graduate Degrees Offered in Kinesiology and Community Health

Degree programs are individually designed with each student planning, in consultation with their academic advisor, a program of course work and involvement in research activities appropriate to the student's academic interests and professional goals.

The Kinesiology Program offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Major areas of specialization at both the master’s and doctoral degree levels include:

  • Biobehavioral Kinesiology (the study of biomechanics, exercise and sport psychology, kinesmetrics, motor control and learning, and motor development); Cultural Pedagogical & Interpretive Studies (the study of the interaction between physical activity and the individual from a variety of cultural, sociological and pedagogical perspectives); and Exercise Physiology/Athletic Training (the study of exercise stress on body systems and the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of exercise and sport related injuries).
  • The Community Health Program offers graduate programs leading to degrees of Master in Public Health (MPH), Master of Science (MS) in Community Health, Master of Science (MS) in Rehabilitation, and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Community Health.
  • The Master of Public Health provides education and training in the five core areas of public health: Health Policy and Management, Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Environmental Health, and Health Behavior and Promotion. A "Concentration" is offered in Health Behavior and Promotion. In addition to Core and Concentration courses, students take electives, complete an off-site Practicum and do a final "capstone" project that integrates knowledge and skills acquired as an MPH student. More specific information about this program can be found at http://mph.illinois.edu/
  • The Master of Science in Public Health program specializes in community health. Courses relate to public health and measurement sciences, community health analysis, health related behavior, and educational processes and programming, epidemiology, and health policy and administration. This program is no longer admitting new students.
  • The Master of Science in Community Health degree is offered for four specializations. The Epidemiology specialization prepares graduates for advanced public health research or as health specialists in epidemiology. The Health policy and Administration specialization concentrates on health policy, health services administration, business, and political science. The Global Health specialization is focused on issues related to the globalization of health The Chronic Disease, Disability, and Society specialization employs a multi-disciplinary perspective to examine complex individual, social, and environmental factors that contribute to chronic disease, disability and health disparities.
  • The Master of Science in Rehabilitation degree is offered for four specializations. Rehabilitation counseling, accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education, prepares graduates for careers as counselors for clients with disabilities, and for the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor examination. Rehabilitation administration prepares graduates for positions as administrators, coordinators, and planners in a variety of rehabilitation service settings. General rehabilitation prepares graduates for careers in a variety of settings serving clients with a broad spectrum of disabilities. Supported employment focuses on the place/train method of job placement and prepares graduates for careers as directors of supported employment programs.
  • The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Community Health is offered with specializations in health education, health policy, health services research, epidemiology and rehabilitation.
  • A PhD in Community Health or Kinesiology can be earned in combination with the MD degree under the Medical Scholars Program of the College of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign, University of Illinois at Chicago. Application to this program is made first to the College of Medicine. Admission to the Community Health or Kinesiology graduate program is conditional upon admission to the Medical Scholars Program. The two degrees can be completed in seven years. More information about the Medical Scholars Program can be found at http://www.med.illinois.edu/msp/.

Dual Degree Programs

It is possible, with the prior approval of both departments, to pursue two post-baccalaureate (i.e., graduate) degrees simultaneously. Such dual degree programs require students to complete all requirements for each degree; however with the approval of both departments, students will have the opportunity to integrate their studies rather than completing the degrees in series. A student pursuing two post-baccalaureate degrees simultaneously also must be registered in each department or program for at least 12 hours for at least one term in order to obtain both degrees.

http://www.grad.illinois.edu/gradhandbook/chapteriv/section01

Students interested in completing a dual degree should contact the Associate Head for Graduate Studies.

Graduate Faculty

Kinesiology Program

Faculty—Research Specialization
Marni D. Boppart, ScD—Exercise Physiology; Molecular Muscle Physiology
Nicholas Burd
Michael De Lisio
Kim Graber, EdD—Study of Preservice Teacher Education; Pedagogy
Manuel Hernandez
Charles H. Hillman, PhD—Psychology of Exercise; Psychophysiology
Naiman Khan
Melissa Littlefield, PhD—Cultural Studies, Body Studies, Feminist Science and Technology
Citlali Lopez-Ortiz
Edward McAuley, PhD—Psychology of Exercise, Aging, Physical Activity, and Health Behavior
Robert Motl, PhD—Psychology of Exercise
Sean Mullen, Ph.D. —Psychology of Exercise
Steven J. Petruzzello, PhD—Psychology of Exercise; Psychophysiology
Lara Pilutti
Ian Rice, PhD—Rehabilitation Science, Biomechanics & Assistive Technology
Jacob Sosnoff, PhD—Motor Behavior & Control
Synthia Sydnor, PhD—History and Anthropology of Physical Activity
Linda Trinh
Kenneth Wilund, PhD—Exercise Physiology
Amy Woods, PhD—Pedagogy
Jeffrey Woods, PhD—Exercise Physiology, Specialization in Immunology
Weimo Zhu, PhD—Measurement, Research Design and Statistics

Community Health Program

Faculty—Research Specialization

Reginald J. Alston, PhD—Rehabilitation and Disability Studies
Ruopeng An
Flavia Andrade, PhD—Demography of Health and Aging
David Buchner, MD, MPH—Physical Activity and Aging
Chung-Yi Chiu
Susan Farner, PhD—Health Policy and Administration
Robyn Gobin
Diana Grigsby-Toussaint, PhD—Social Epidemiology
Juliet Iwelunmor
Yih-Kuen Jan, PT, PhD—Health Disparities & Disability
Hillary Klonoff-Cohen
Sandraluz Lara-Cinisomo
Stephen Notaro, PhD—Health Policy and Administration
Laura Rice
Karin A. Rosenblatt, PhD, MPH—Epidemiology
Andiara Schwingel, PhD—Aging, Public Health
David Strauser, PhD, CRC—Rehabilitation

The Advisory System

During their graduate careers students will receive advice and guidance from many faculty members both individually and collectively. The general nature of student advisement is outlined below.

The Academic Advisor

A student is admitted for graduate study when there is a faculty member who is willing to serve as the student’s advisor. This individual will typically serve as a student's major professor and will usually chair and direct a student's thesis or dissertation. However, as students' research interests and career goals often change, a student may request to change advisors at any time. Students should not hesitate to change advisors, but they must: (1) find a faculty member who is willing to serve as their new advisor; (2) inform their current advisor of the change; and (3) file necessary paper work with the appropriate Departmental Graduate Office.

In most cases, your academic advisor will act as your thesis/dissertation advisor and mentor. However, it is not unusual to have a faculty member other than your academic advisor as your Director of Research.

Guidance Committees

Students will have a number of committees appointed to guide and evaluate their work, including: (1) doctoral candidacy review committees, (2) thesis committees, (3) dissertation committees, (4) doctoral preliminary examination committees, and (5) doctoral final examination committees. See the appropriate graduate program description for specific guidance committees for your degree.

Back to Top

 

Financial Assistance

Financial assistance is available to graduate students in a number of forms including departmental teaching and research assistantships, Graduate College fellowships, and student loans.

Department Support

Research and teaching assistantships are available on a competitive basis to qualified master's and doctoral candidates. Stipends vary and may include a waiver of tuition and some fees. These assistantships serve as a valuable source of experience in research and teaching and, thus, graduate students should endeavor to obtain both kinds of appointments during their period of study. These assistantships may include tuition and fee waivers (if assistantship is at least 25%) and a minimum stipend that is negotiated with the Graduate Employee Organization. A 50% assignment includes a 20 hour per week work commitment. The maximum assistantship appointment for graduate students is generally 50%. It is expected that students will not accept assistantship loads above 50% without prior notification of the Departmental Graduate Office. This notification should be in writing and pertains to any funding over 50% regardless of the source of support.

Most teaching and research assistantships awarded by the Department are for the nine-month academic year with continuation of the tuition waiver through the Summer Session. Assistantships are subject to review for re-appointment each year. In general, assistantships are awarded for no more than two (2) academic years for master's degree students and for no more than three (3) academic years for doctoral degree students.

Every effort is made to secure financial aid for graduate students during their period of study. It should be noted that graduate assistantships are not an entitlement and that acceptance into the program does not guarantee an assistantship in the future. The vagaries of state and university funding, successful procurement of external grant funds by faculty, and opportunities across campus dictate assistantship offerings.

Examples of the types of departmental financial support available for graduate students are outlined below. Details about financial aid and particular forms of financial support may be obtained from the Departmental Graduate Office and the Graduate College.

Teaching Assistantships

Department Teaching Assistantships (TAs) are awarded to graduate students for instructional duties in the Department. There are a variety of teaching assignments. TAs assigned to graduate and undergraduate courses are typically responsible for discussion and/or laboratory sections, some grading, and an occasional lecture. A graduate student holding a half-time appointment (50%) should not be expected to work in excess of 20 hours per week on the average. The professor to whom the teaching assistant reports determines the responsibilities of the student. This professor is also the main source of information and feedback to the student and to the department about the student.

Research Assistantships

Research Assistantships (RAs) are available through grant funds obtained by faculty members in support of their research. Responsibilities of RAs vary widely and are arranged individually with professors and/or laboratory directors. Some assignments require RAs to work with fixed schedules throughout the period of their appointment, while others require large and concentrated investments of time. Both types of schedules should conform to the standard that assistants with a half-time (50%) appointment not work in excess of 20 hours per week on the average.

Other Assistantships

In addition to TAs and RAs other types of graduate assistantships may be awarded upon occasion. For example, a graduate student may be given an administrative assistantship to perform a variety of tasks for the department head or another administrator.

Frequently graduate students secure assistantships in other departments on campus. It should be noted that these assistantships do not include a tuition and fee waiver in the Department of Kinesiology & Community Health unless the work being performed is directly related to the student’s degree program. Prior to accepting an assistantship from outside the department, it is advisable to check with the Departmental Graduate Office in regard to the tuition waiver.

Travel and Absence from Campus

Graduate students who are supported by the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health must complete the “Kinesiology and Community Health Travel and Absence Report” when away from campus during their contract period. The completed form can be obtained from Tina Candler in Room 117 Freer Hall. Once completed, it should be returned to Tina Candler in room 117 Freer Hall.

Graduate College Support

In addition to departmental support, graduate students may apply for financial aid from the Graduate College. Financial support from the Graduate College includes: (1) university fellowships, (2) graduate college fellowships, (3) dissertation completion awards, (4) dissertation travel grants, (5) conference travel support. Below are a few descriptions of support available through the Graduate College. Further information on this support may be found on the Graduate College website at: http://www.grad.illinois.edu/funding-jobs

University Fellowships

These fellowships are awarded based on academic and scholarly achievement. Students in all fields of graduate study are eligible.

Graduate College Fellowships

As described in the Graduate College Handbook from the Graduate College:
"These fellowships are part of Graduate College’s effort to increase the enrollment of minority students in those academic areas where they have been traditionally under represented. Graduate College Fellowships are generally awarded to students who are beginning graduate work so that they can devote their first year entirely to study. Some multi-year awards are made to entering doctoral students whose records are outstanding.”

Dissertation Completion Fellowships (https://www.grad.illinois.edu/fellowship/listing/2807)

Dissertation Completion Fellowships are designed to help outstanding students complete the doctoral degree in a timely fashion by providing a one-year stipend of $20,000, a full waiver of tuition, service fee, health service fee, AFMFA fee, Library fee, as well as basic dental and vision coverage. In addition, the Fellow will receive partial payment of the graduate student health insurance fee per semester. The intent is to free Fellows from assistantships and other such obligations, allowing them to devote full-time to the completion of the dissertation. No concurrent assistantship appointment or employment of any kind is permitted with the Dissertation Completion Fellowship. All applications must be screened and ranked by the Department before being submitted to the Graduate College.

Graduate College Dissertation Travel Grants (https://www.grad.illinois.edu/fellowship/listing/2901)

Dissertation Travel Grants provide reimbursement to subsidize travel and associated costs necessary for doctoral dissertation research, whether for exploring a potential dissertation topic (i.e., before extensive research has been done) or for conducting dissertation research. Approximately 12 grants at amounts up to $5,000 will be awarded given sufficient funding. All applications must be screened and ranked by the Department before being submitted to the Graduate College.

Conference Travel Support (http://www.grad.illinois.edu/general/travelaward)

The Graduate College will provide awards, not to exceed $300, for students to travel to professional conferences. These Conference Travel Awards are intended to support students who will be presenting papers, posters, or creative work at the conferences they attend. Please note that the award amount from the Graduate College is based on the distance between the University of Illinois Urbana campus and the student's conference destination. Conference Travel Awards are supported by Students for Equal Access to Learning (SEAL) fees. Note that financial support from the Department is required for conference travel. Also note that all applications must be screened and ranked by a committee assigned by the Associate Head for Graduate Studies.

A committee of three graduate faculty members is appointed to assist the Associate Head for Graduate Studies in screening and ranking all applications. The review committee uses the criteria listed below.

Criteria for Ranking of Grants for Graduate Student Conference Travel, Thesis/Project, and Dissertation Research:

Scientific merit:

  • Significance of the study;
  • Originality of problem formulation;
  • Soundness of methodology;
  • Quality of presentation

With respect to conference presentations, greater weighing will be given to:

  • Invited papers;
  • More prestigious conferences (e.g., all things being equal, will be weighted in the following order: national, regional, state, and local conference);
  • First or sole authorship;
  • A conference presentation directly related to a student's area of specialization.

Other forms of financial aid can be found on the Graduate College website at: http://www.grad.illinois.edu/fellowships. There are also competitive Departmental scholarships that are available to graduate students. Applications for these scholarships are announced during the Spring semester.

The Office of Student Financial Aid awards scholarships, federal work-study, and loans to graduate and professional students. Scholarships are not available to students holding assistantships. Application for need-based assistance is made separately from an application for fellowships, assistantships, and tuition/fee waivers. A need-analysis document, either the Family Financial Statement (FFS) or the Financial Aid Form (FAF), must be completed. A student applying for a Guaranteed Student Loan must file the FFS or FAF in addition to the loan application. Students are advised to delay processing guaranteed loan applications until they have received responses to applications for other need-based assistance and fellowships, assistantships and tuition/fee waivers.

Graduate Programs in Kinesiology and Community Health

In the following sections the specific requirements for degrees offered by the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health are provided. While each degree has unique requirements there are a number of factors common to all degrees. Some of these requirements are outlined here and additional requirements may be found in The Graduate College Handbook of Policy and Requirements for Students, Faculty and Staff available on the Graduate College web page (http://www.grad.illinois.edu/gradhandbook).

Back to Top

 

Satisfactory Progress Toward Degree

Good Standing

To remain in good standing a graduate student must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0, carry a normal load unless exceptions are granted, and complete required courses in the expected time period. Guidance of students towards completion of degree requirements is a responsibility of the student’s faculty advisor. Failure to comply with any Graduate College requirement, such as maintenance of a 3.0 GPA, or completion of degree in the overall time limit, results in notification by the Graduate College and appropriate action by the Department.

If a student fails to meet the requirements for good standing in any given semester, the student may be given a grace period of one semester to meet the requirements. However, if an Advisory Committee concludes that a student will be unable to meet the requirements within the allowable period, the student can be terminated immediately.

Grading System

Final grades for courses are recorded as follows: A+,A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D- and F (failure), with numerical computations of grade point averages based on a system where A = 4.0. Faculty are not required to use plus and minus grades. Other symbols in use, but not included in the computation of grade-point averages are:

W — Officially withdrawn from a course

Ex — Temporarily excused. Used by the instructor if he/she is granted an extension of time to a student who has not completed the final examination or other requirements for the course. An excused grade must be replaced by a letter grade no later than the designated date the next semester in which the student is registered or one year from the date the excused grade was incurred if the student does not register. Failure to complete the work within these time periods results in a grade of F. This is termed the “F by rule”.

Df — Grade temporarily deferred. Used only in thesis research courses and other approved courses that extend beyond one semester.

S or U — Satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Used only as final grades for thesis research, courses offered for 0 credit, and for certain approved courses.

CR/NC — Credit or No Credit. Used only if a graduate student has registered for a course under the credit-no credit option with the approval of his or her major department.

Minimum Grade Point Average

The Graduate Programs in Kinesiology and Community Health follow the Graduate College is requiring that its “Graduate students must maintain satisfactory progress in all aspects of their degree programs in order to continue as students. The Graduate College monitors cumulative graduate grade point average, and the graduate programs monitor all other aspects of academic progress. There are three categories of Academic Standing: Good Standing, Probation and Dismissal.” Specific information related to these issues, including how grade point average (GPA) is computed and minimum GPA can be found in the Graduate College Handbook (http://www.grad.illinois.edu/gradhandbook/chapteriii/section02).

Ex Grades

Students are cautioned against a practice of taking Ex (temporarily excused) grades instead of completing coursework in a timely manner. An Ex grade represents part of one semester’s work that is undone and must be added to the next semester’s load. It tends to diminish the benefits gained from any course and blur the focus of the material covered. Worst of all, Ex grades can seriously jeopardize a student’s academic standing. An Ex is not counted in the computation of a student’s grade point average, but does when it reverts &mdash automatically &mdash to an F.

Several alternatives present themselves to a student whose Ex grade is about to revert to an F. One, of course, is to complete the work for the course. A second is to petition the Graduate College to drop the course retroactively. If the instructor does not object and there is no clear reason why that would be inappropriate (e.g., a minimum course requirement), the Department is likely to recommend approval of such a petition. A third alternative is to petition the Graduate College for an extension of the excused period. Such a petition will generally NOT be looked upon favorably by the Department. The second extension would exacerbate the ills inherent in Ex grades and make a travesty of the idea of good progress through graduate study. In certain exceptional cases, brief extensions may be recommended by the Department but only if the overdue work has been completed. Even though an Ex grade has reverted to an F, it may still be changed by the instructor. Both the Department and the Graduate College look unfavorably on both retroactive dropping of courses and Ex grades. Students are strongly advised to avoid such practices whenever possible.

Credit Loads

The typical graduate student credit load is 12 hours. The number of hours taken depends on the students’ assistantship duties or outside employment. University maximum and minimum credit loads are listed below.

Maximum Credit Loads

Within the following credit load ranges, graduate students with various percentages of University appointments are considered to be making normal progress toward a degree. Students are not encouraged to carry loads above or below these limits, although advisers may permit exceptions when good reasons are presented. The lowest normal load is the highest permissible minimum which a department may require.

The maximum amount of credit in which a student can enroll without special overload approval from the Graduate College is:
Fall and Spring terms — 24 hours
Summer Term 1 — 6 hours
Summer Term 2 — 12 hours

A student who wishes to enroll above the established maximum must have a petition approved by the Department and the Graduate College.

Minimum Credit Loads

A full academic load for insurance, visa, loan, etc., purposes is considered by the University to be 12 or more hours. For international students with assistantships between 25 and 67%, 8 hours is considered full-time. All graduate students with fellowships require 12 hours for full time standing.

In addition, the Kinesiology Program requires all Kinesiology graduate students with teaching or research assistantships to register for 12 hours (fall and spring semesters).

Residence Requirements and Time Limits

Master’s Degree

The Graduate College requires that all master’s degree candidates must complete all degree requirements, under normal circumstances, within five (5) years after their first registration in the Graduate College. One half or more of the courses applied towards a master’s degree must be earned in courses meeting on the University of Illinois campuses (Urbana-Champaign, Chicago, or Springfield), or in courses meeting in other locations approved by the Graduate College.

Master’s degree candidates may petition for registration in absentia if they have completed the residence credit required and have not exceeded the time limit for the degree.

Doctoral Degree

The Graduate College residence requirement stipulates that at least 64 of the 96 minimum hours, including thesis credit, must be earned in courses meeting on the Urbana-Champaign campus. After the residence requirement has been fulfilled, a student may petition the Graduate College for permission to register in absentia for thesis credit.

A doctoral candidate must complete all requirements within seven (7) years of first registering in the Graduate College. A candidate for the doctoral degree who has received a master’s degrees elsewhere, however, must complete the requirements within six (6) years after first registration in the doctoral degree program on this campus. If a candidate’s program of study has been significantly interrupted after receiving a master’s degrees from this University, and if the candidate later returns to work on their doctoral degree, s/he is allowed six (6) years after the return to complete all degree requirements. An interruption is significant only if it lasts longer than twelve (12) months.

Exceptions and registration requirements

Students in the Medical Scholars Program must complete the Ph.D. in ten (10) years. If the student is pursuing an M.D. and a master’s degree, they must complete the master’s degree within eight (8) years. If the student received the master’s degree elsewhere, she or he must complete the Ph.D. within nine (9) years from first registration.

If minimum course requirements have been met, the Preliminary Examination passed and University facilities are no longer needed, the student simply does not register until the semester when the Final Examination will be scheduled and the degree granted. The student must register on campus or petition for in absentia registration during the degree granting semester. In either instance the student applies for readmission (no fee is necessary if within five (5) years of initial date of entry) and may register for 599 with zero credit. When this route is chosen the advisor should notify the Departmental Graduate Office of this intention in order that the Department and the Graduate College will know that the student is still a degree candidate and that s/he need not be alerted to the encumbrance of further registration.

If more than five (5) years elapse between a student’s preliminary and final examinations, the student will be required to demonstrate that his or her knowledge is current by passing a second preliminary examination, which is a prerequisite for admission to the final examination.

If an International student wishes to leave campus and return later for the final dissertation defense, they should consult with the International Students Office prior to leaving campus.

Back to Top

 

Graduate Student Petitions

The right to petition is virtually unlimited with regard to any Graduate College requirement or regulation. However, frivolous petitions are not often granted and both the petitioner and those recommending approval lose credibility with the Graduate College. Although there may be exceptions, the Departmental Graduate Office does not often recommend approval of petitions not recommended by the student’s advisor. Similarly, the Graduate College does not often approve petitions not recommended by the Departmental Graduate Office. A petition approved at a lower level may still be denied at a higher level.

The Graduate Student Petition form should be completed by the student in consultation with his/her advisor to request any exceptions to Graduate College rules, regulations, or requirements. More specifically, (1) the petition should be well prepared; and (2) a clear, cogent and convincing rationale must be provided by both the student and his/her advisor as to why the petition should be approved.

Petition forms are available in the Department Graduate Office or on-line from the Graduate College (http://www.grad.illinois.edu/petitions). After the student justifies the request on the petition, the student gives the petition to his or her academic advisor. The advisor provides their recommendation and sends it to the Departmental Graduate Office. The Associate Head for Graduate Studies makes a recommendation and forwards the form to the Graduate College. Petitions should not be sent directly to the Graduate College.

Back to Top

 

Research and Human Subjects

University policy for the use of human subjects in research is applicable to any activity conducted at, or sponsored by, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign which involves human subjects (i.e., living individuals) about whom an investigator (student or professional) conducting research obtains (1) data through intervention or interaction with the individual, or (2) identifiable private information. The policy applies to research involving human beings whose physical, emotional, or behavioral conditions, responses, tissues, or fluids are investigated for any purpose other than to solely benefit the subject as an individual. It applies to the use of interviews, tests, observations, and inquiries to obtain nonpublic information about individuals or groups. Pilot projects, student dissertation projects, independent study projects, and course projects must follow this policy if they involve human subjects in research.

The following requirements must be met in order to use human subjects in research:

  • All research projects must be reviewed by the Institutional Review Board (irb.illinois.edu/).
  • The investigators must adhere to ethical codes and applicable policies of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the sponsor, and cooperating institutions. They must train and supervise their staff and students participating in the research to follow these principles. Risk to subjects should be minimized.
  • Investigators must make sure that subjects participate in research only as the result of informed voluntary consent. The nature of consent processes and documentation should be designed to fit the research, risks, and types of subject involved. They must conform to University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign requirements and comply with applicable law and sponsor requirements.
  • Information obtained must be kept confidential unless permission to do otherwise was obtained from the subject.
  • All research involving physical activity and exercise must follow the DEPARTMENTAL PROCEDURES FOR THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND EXERCISE STUDIES. All graduate students in Kinesiology and Community Health will receive a manual covering these procedures.
  • Prior to conducting research, students should be thoroughly familiar with the Handbook for Investigators: For the Protection of Human Subjects in Research. This handbook is available on-line at http://irb.illinois.edu/?q=investigator-handbook/index.html.

Back to Top

 

Grievance Procedures

All graduate students in Kinesiology and Community Health may use the Graduate College Grievance Policy to file a grievance. The specific policy and procedures can be found at:
http://www.grad.illinois.edu/policies/gc_grievances#GraduateCollegePolicy

Back to Top

 

Capricious Grading

Capricious grading is the assignment of grades on the basis of some standard other than a student’s performance in a course, on the basis of more exacting standards than were applied to other students in the course, or by a substantial departure from the instructor’s previously announced standards. Capricious grading is dealt with at the departmental level. Each department has a committee that reviews charges of capricious grading brought by students. These committees are made up of elected faculty members and, in some departments, teaching assistant representatives. A student wishing to file a capricious grading complaint should read carefully and follow the procedures given in the appropriate sections of the Student Code, including http://admin.illinois.edu/policy/code/article3_part1_3-107.html.

Back to Top

Graduate Program in Kinesiology

 

Master’s Degree in Kinesiology

General Requirements

Admission to the M.S. program requires a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education, a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 (A=4.0) for the last 60 hours of undergraduate work and any graduate work completed, a minimum total score of ~300 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and three letters of recommendation.

This degree program is designed for those individuals desiring to study a particular area of interest in depth. A student may choose to write an acceptable thesis for 8 hours of credit (i.e., Kinesiology 599) or select a non-thesis option by substituting 8 hours of credit (i.e., approved credit that includes at least 4 hours of Kinesiology 590, Independent Study).

Master of Science Degree Requirements

  1. Thirty-two (32) hours are required. Sixteen (16) of these 32 hours must be in Kinesiology (excluding thesis units – 599).
  2. Students are required to take KINS 501 (Research Methods), 8 hours in their identified major area, and 4 hours from an additional area of study in the Department.
  3. Twelve (12) of the 32 hours must be earned at the 500 level and may include thesis (599) and independent study (590) units. Eight (8) of these 12 hours must be in Kinesiology.
  4. Students taking the thesis option are required to have a minimum of 8 hours of KIN 599. More units may be taken, if the student so desires.
  5. The non-thesis option requires 4 hours of KIN 590.
  6. KIN 591 (seminar, 1 hour) is required each semester.
  7. No more than 8 hours of graduate credit from another institution may be substituted for any of the above requirements.
  8. Master’s degree candidates must complete all degree requirements, under normal circumstances, within five (5) years after initial registration in the Graduate College.
  9. A sample Master’s degree program and a worksheet for your own program can be found at the end of the Graduate Program in Kinesiology section of this Handbook.

Summary: Master of Science

Coming soon: Summary table of Master of Science Required Courses

Thesis Requirements

  1. A Master’s thesis committee must be established before the initiation of the student’s thesis project. The committee consists of the student’s advisor and at least one other graduate faculty member. Academic professionals and advanced graduate students may be asked to serve as additional members of the committee.
  2. The Chairperson of the thesis committee must be a member of the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health and the Graduate Faculty of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The student’s graduate advisor typically serves as both the director of the student’s research and chair of the Master’s thesis committee.
  3. The M.S. proposal and the completed thesis must be reviewed by a student's thesis committee. The Kinesiology Program “Certificate of Results of Committee Meeting for Master of Science Degree Proposal Review” form indicating that the committee has reviewed and accepted the proposal must be turned in to the Departmental Graduate Office before the thesis research can be initiated. A copy of this form is provided on the following page. Theses must conform to the style and format guidelines as stipulated by the Graduate College. Details regarding requirements for thesis preparation can be found at: http://www.grad.illinois.edu/thesis-dissertation.
  4. An oral defense of the thesis is an option that a thesis committee may require.
  5. Once the student’s thesis committee has approved the thesis, it is taken to the Departmental Graduate Office for style and format review. If corrections are needed, the thesis is returned to the candidate and is resubmitted by him/her after corrections are made. The Departmental Graduate Office needs to be given at least two (2) weeks for this review process. After the thesis has been deposited with the Graduate College, the student should also leave a copy with the Department.

Note:
It is important to keep in mind when trying to schedule committee meetings and putting the final touches to your thesis, that faculty attend many conferences throughout the year and most faculty are on nine-month appointments and may not always be easily accessible during the summer. Thus, it is imperative that you work with your advisor and committee well in advance of any deadlines that you are trying to meet so that there is the least amount of disruption for all concerned.

Back to Top

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Kinesiology

Admission Requirements

Admission to the Ph.D. program requires a minimum of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education, a minimum grade-point average of 3.5 (A=4.0) for the last 60 hours of undergraduate work and any graduate work completed, a minimum total score of ~310 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and three letters of recommendation.

International students whose native language is not English must also score a minimum of 550 on the paper-based TOEFL test, 213 on the computer-based test, or 79 on the internet-based test (iBT). Doctor of Philosophy degree candidates pursue an advanced program of study and research in preparation for careers in research and teaching. Candidates must complete 64 hours of work beyond the master's degree. They must also successfully complete the preliminary and final doctoral examinations.

Procedures for Applying to Ph.D. after M.S. Work

Students admitted to the University of Illinois for study toward the Master’s degree in Kinesiology and interested in pursuing the Ph.D. degree must, upon completion or near completion of the Master’s degree, submit a letter of application to the department and have the application approved before being officially recognized as a student in the Ph.D. program. As they are already admitted to the University and the Graduate College the procedure is simplified and without fee. However, it is important for students to understand that acceptance in the doctoral program is very competitive. Completion of the M.S. degree does not grant automatic passage into the Ph.D. program. In order to avoid interruption in registration and to receive full consideration for financial assistance (i.e., assistantships), it is recommended that applications be made by December 1. The credentials needed for review, in addition to those submitted in application for the Master’s degree program, are as follows:

  1. A letter to the Associate Head for Graduate Studies, making application for admission to study toward the Ph.D. degree.
  2. A written statement giving the rationale for wishing to pursue the Ph.D. degree and the projected area of research specialization. (This may be included in the letter of application listed above.)
  3. Results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE; verbal, quantitative, and analytical and/or writing).
  4. Completed Master’s thesis or equivalent research report, approved and accepted at the Departmental level.
  5. Letter of reference written by Master’s degree program advisor.
  6. Two additional references from University of Illinois faculty, other than advisor, who will provide references regarding scholarly potential for doctoral study. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements

  1. Sixty-fours (64) hours are required beyond the Master's degree. Of the 96 total hours required for masters and doctoral degrees, 64 must be taken on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus, the University of Illinois-Chicago campus, or in courses meeting in other locations that have been approved by the Graduate College.
  2. Competency in research methodology appropriate to the area of study is required. This competency is normally demonstrated by completion of 12 hours of research methods/statistics with a grade of B or better. KIN 501 may be counted towards these 12 hours of course work.
  3. A minimum of 24 hours (excluding KIN 599) must be taken in Kinesiology beyond the Master’s degree. Students admitted to the doctoral program with only a baccalaureate degree must take a minimum of 40 hours in Kinesiology.
  4. KIN 591 (seminar, 1 hour) is required each semester.
  5. KIN 565 (4 hours; this is currently pending approval from the Graduate College).
  6. Up to 8 hours of independent study (KIN 590) may be counted toward the 64 hours beyond the master's degree. However, because independent research is such an integral part of doctoral studies, students are encouraged to take additional 590 units.
  7. A minimum of 32 hours of dissertation research (KIN 599) is required.
  8. Doctoral candidates must complete all requirements within seven (7) years of their initial registration in the Graduate College. Candidates for the doctoral degree who have received a master's degree elsewhere, however, must complete their requirements within six (6) years after their initial registration.
  9. A sample Doctoral degree program and a worksheet for your own program can be found at the end of the Graduate Program in Kinesiology section of this handbook.

Summary: Doctor of Philosophy

Coming soon: Summary table of Doctor of Philosophy Required hours

General Plan of Study and Sample MS/PhD Programs in Kinesiology

Coming soon: Table with sample Master of Science Degree program

See the Doctoral Candidacy Review requirements

Back to Top

 

Graduate Program in Community Health

 

Master’s Degrees in Community Health

General Requirements

For admission into all master's degree programs, applicants must have completed a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education and have achieved a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. The GPA is computed for the applicant’s last 60 hours of undergraduate courses for the degree (excluding field work, student teaching and physical activity courses). In addition, for any graduate work completed, a minimum GPA of at least 3.0 is required. The GPAs for undergraduate and any graduate work are calculated separately. Both should be 3.0 or higher for admission. Satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), taken within the last five (5) years at time of application, are also required. Applicants must have completed undergraduate coursework in social and biological science, mathematics and statistics, and data analysis.

Master of Science Degree Requirements

 

M.S. in Community Health / Specialization in Health Policy and Administration

The specialization in Health Policy and Administration generally takes two years depending upon prior education and experience. A minimum of 48 hours of graduate credit is required. Twenty-four (24) hours must be at the 500 level with12 hours in Community Health courses. Students will be expected at entry to the program to have completed undergraduate coursework in economics, social sciences, and data collection and processing which includes issues of measurement, questionnaire design, computerization, descriptive health measures, and statistical analysis through regression. Courses must have been completed with grades of B or better. Deficiencies in these areas will require additional coursework, as necessary, for successful completion of the degree. Students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (A=4.0) during the master's program. Course requirements are:

Master of Science in Community Health Program Core
  • CHLH 429—Research Techniques—4 hours
  • CHLH 474—Principles of Epidemiology—4 hours
  • CHLH 510—Public Health Development—4 hours
  • CHLH 591—Seminar—4 hours
Additional Required Courses
  • CHLH 456—Organization of Health Care—4 hours
  • CHLH 550—Health Policy in the United States—4 hours
  • CHLH 599—Thesis Research—4 hours
Electives

Twelve (12) hours of elective coursework. Electives may be drawn from a wide range of courses, in consultation with the advisor, to suit student interest.

Back to Top

 

M.S. in Community Health / Specialization in Epidemiology and Health Behavior

The specialization in Epidemiology requires a minimum of 32 hours of graduate credit with at least 12 hours at the 500 level, eight hours of which must be in Community Health. For admission, students must be adequately prepared in undergraduate coursework in biological and social sciences and mathematics. Students must take an additional 4 hours of coursework in statistics (CHLH 590 Biostatistics or SOC 485 Intermediate Social Statistics, or equivalent), if they did not complete courses through regression and correlation with a grade of B or better in their undergraduate study; and an additional unit of coursework in data analysis (CHLH 421 Health Data Analysis, or equivalent), if they did not complete such a course with a grade of B or better in their undergraduate study. Students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (A=4.0) during the master's program. Course requirements are:

Master of Science in Community Health Program Core
  • CHLH 429—Research Techniques—4 hours
  • CHLH 474—Principles of Epidemiology—4 hours
  • CHLH 510—Public Health Development—4 hours
  • CHLH 591—Seminar—4 hours
Additional Required Courses
  • CHLH 469—Environmental Health—4 hours
  • CHLH 527—Statistics in Epidemiology—4 hours
  • CHLH 578—Applied Epidemiology—4 hours
  • CHLH 599—Thesis—4 hours
Electives

Electives may be drawn from a wide range of courses, in consultation with the advisor, to suit student interest.

Back to Top

M.S. in Community Health / Specialization in Global Health

The specializations in Global Health and Chronic Disease, Disability, and Society require a minimum of 32 hours of graduate credit with at least 12 hours at the 500 level, eight hours of which must be in Community Health. Students are required to take 3 core courses in the core content areas in community health: public health development, health behavior theory, and health policy in the United States. In addition, students are required to take two methodology courses, a Department-wide seminar, and complete a research-based thesis. Students who graduate from the program develop overall knowledge of the community health field and the tools necessary for advanced research and practice. The specializations in Global Health and Chronic Disease, Disability, and Society require completion of an additional 8 hours of coursework. These specializations are consistent with larger trends in the field toward globalization and chronic disease. They are intended to provide the foundation for future or practice in the topic areas. Students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (A=4.0) during the master's program. Course requirements are:

Master of Science in Community Health Program Core

CHLH 510—Public Health Development—4 hours
CHLH 540—Health Behavior: Theory—4 hours
CHLH 550—Health Policy: United States—4 hours
CHLH 591—Seminar—4 hours

Additional Required Methodology Courses

CHLH 429—Research Techniques—4 hours
Elective methodology course—4

Electives

Electives may be drawn from a wide range of courses, in consultation with the advisor, to suit student interest and to be consistent with the specialization.

CHLH 599—Thesis—8 hours

Summary: Master of Science, Community Health

Coming soon: Summary table of Master of Science, Community Health required courses for various specializations

Back to Top

 

M.S. in Rehabilitation

Introduction

The Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Rehabilitation is offered to prepare participants for careers as rehabilitation professionals. Available areas of concentration are rehabilitation administration, rehabilitation counseling, and general rehabilitation. A curriculum in supported employment is available as a general rehabilitation option. The academic program provides diverse opportunities for students, both those enrolled in the rehabilitation degree programs as well as graduate student assistants from other campus units. Research opportunities in areas such as testing persons with severe disabilities, culture and disability, adaptive technologies, and characteristics of persons with disabilities in the competitive job market are available in conjunction with research programs of the academic faculty.

Rehabilitation Graduate Degree program

The Masters of Science in Rehabilitation requires the completion of REHB 401, 402, 501 and 585; with electives and specific requirements depending upon the area of specialization. A minimum of 40 credit hours is required. Twelve (12) hours must be at the 500 level and eight (8) of these must be in Rehabilitation. Students who choose to become eligible to sit for the certificate exam as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) must complete 48 credit hours to meet the accreditation requirements of the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE). All students must have completed one course in basic statistics before graduation.

Rehabilitation Counseling prepares graduates for careers as rehabilitation counselors of clients with physical, mental, and emotional disabilities. Graduates are prepared to take the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor examination. The program is accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Counselor Education. Rehabilitation Administration prepares graduates for positions as administrators, coordinators, and planners in a variety of rehabilitation settings. Supported Employmenthas been identified as a track within the general rehabilitation concentration. It focuses on methods of job placement for persons with disabilities. Supported employment specialists often work in rehabilitation facilities as directors of supported employment programs.

Summary: Master of Science, Rehabilitation

Coming soon: Summary table of Master of Science, Rehabilitation required courses

Back to Top

General Plan of Study and Sample MS/PhD Programs in Community Health
Sample Course Sequence for Concentration in Rehabilitation Counseling

Semester 1
REHB 401—Introduction to Rehabilitation—4 hours
REHB 402—Medical Aspects of Disability—4 hours
EPSY 419—Counseling Pre-Practicum—4 hours
EPSY 420—Theories of Psychotherapy—4 hours

Semester 2
REHB 403—Independent Living—2 hours
REHB 444—Adaptive Technologies—4 hours
REHB 520—Psycho-Social Aspects—4 hours
REHB 435—Job Placement Techniques—2 hours
SPED 444—Career Development and Individuals with Disabilities—2 hours

Semester 3
REHB 407—Disability, Culture and Society—2 hours
REHB 585—Rehabilitation Practicum —4 hours
REHB 501—Rehabilitation Research—4 hours
REHB 536—Vocational Evaluation—4 hours
REHB 591—Seminar in Rehabilitation—2 hours

Semester 4
REHB 583—Counseling Internship—4 hours
Elective—4 hours
Elective—4 hours

Minimum of 48 credit hours required for CRC certification.
Basic statistics course (such as EPSY 480) required prior to graduation, preferably prior to REHB 501.
Basic testing course (such as EPSY 487) recommended before REHB 536.
Highly recommended: EPSY 487, SOCW 552.

Back to Top

Supervised Fieldwork in Rehabilitation Settings
Introduction

Supervised field experience is essential to the preparation of rehabilitation professionals. The purpose of the experience is to provide students majoring in rehabilitation with an opportunity to develop and refine their counseling or administrative skills within the functional milieu of a rehabilitation or related agency. Depending on the program concentration requirements, the following courses are offered as part of the "core" curriculum to graduate students in rehabilitation education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Rehabilitation 585&mdashRehabilitation Practicum&mdash 4 hours Rehabilitation 583&mdash Counseling Internship&mdash 4 hours

Only graduate students in the counseling and supported employment tracks are required to complete both of the fieldwork courses mentioned above. Students enrolled in the administration track are only required to enroll in Rehabilitation 585; however, they may also elect to complete Rehabilitation 583.

Note: Any student wishing to eventually be eligible to sit for the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) examination must accrue sufficient supervised clinical hours. At the time of this writing, 600 hours (on a semester basis) of supervised internship and at least 100 hours of supervised practicum are required as one of the eligibility criteria identified in the Guide to Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (effective March 10, 1990) by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification.

Policy Regarding Student Assignment

It is the responsibility of the Fieldwork Committee to review the specific services and policies of each field agency on a regular basis. This information is provided to the student for the purpose of proper selection of an appropriate placement. Students are then placed in a suitable situation based on their needs and those of the agency. Criteria for acceptability of placements are based on the nature of assigned responsibilities; qualifications and credentials of the supervisor, including professional degrees and certification; and recognized quality of services provided by the agency, including accreditation status where appropriate. Interns who are not supervised in the agency by staff holding the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) credential are assigned for supervision to a university faculty member who does hold the CRC credential.

Students performing more than one fieldwork experience should attempt to work in more than one rehabilitation agency setting. Practicum and internship sites chosen should be based on personal interest, professional development needs, and a realistic employment outlook. Students will apply in writing and be reviewed for fieldwork readiness by the Committee. Each student should apply for fieldwork prior to the semester in which the placement will be completed (November 1 for spring placement; April 1 for summer and/or fall placement). The letter of application should be submitted to Dr. David Strauser, Coordinator of the Master's in Rehabilitation Program. See Appendix A at the end of this section (page 63) for more details.

Specific Student, Agency, and Divisional Responsibilities

Student Responsibilities

Students should arrange their work schedules to conform to the agency requirements. Agency policies regarding dress, time of arrival, departure, confidentiality, and other relevant work practices should be followed.

Agency Responsibilities

The agency assigns qualified and interested staff to oversee the student's work and provide general supervision. A regular time schedule should be set each week for supervisor-student consultation and the supervisor should be available to the student at other times for assistance. The practicum or internship program developed by the agency should provide the student with a realistic and representative experience of the actual duties performed by full-time professionals within that agency context. Hopefully, the agency will be able to promote the student's growth in self direction, acceptance and knowledge of professional responsibilities, and increased competencies in the provision of the appropriate rehabilitation services.

Divisional Responsibilities

The Rehabilitation Graduate Program will provide regular supervisory sessions for both practicum and internship students. Students are expected to discuss practicum/internship issues during the sessions. Regular contact will be maintained with participating agency representatives to discuss a student's progress and to provide necessary assistance. A schedule will be maintained with participating agency representatives to discuss a student's progress and to provide necessary assistance. A schedule of three agency contacts each semester is followed—initial, mid-semester review, and final—when the student, agency supervisor, and university supervisor can meet together to discuss progress.

Individualized written objectives are established for each student in each practicum and internship placement and are included in the "Field Experience Contract." (Appendix B at the end of this section, page 66). The objectives are determined at a joint meeting of the student, agency supervisor, and university supervisor held at the beginning of the semester. Responsibilities and objectives are based primarily on the professional development needs of the student, while also considering the unique characteristics of the agency placement and the interests and expertise of the supervisor.

Student Objectives

Depending on the program track or concentration:

  • To apply classroom knowledge and skills.
  • To develop confidence in the ability to fulfill professional responsibilities in activities related to rehabilitation (e.g., counseling, case management, placement, policy analysis, program planning, etc.)
  • To gain experience in rehabilitation related relationships with clients, other professionals and other agencies.
  • To experience counselor-client relationships and the role that self-understanding plays in the relationship.
  • To become acquainted with the organizational structure, processes, and working conditions of rehabilitation and related agencies.
  • To stimulate the formation of and identification with a professional role.
  • To provide an awareness of the process of community organization in meeting client needs.
  • To gain experience in working with a multi or interdisciplinary team.
University Objectives
  • To assess the student's ability to move from classroom experiences into "real life" situations in rehabilitation practice areas.
  • To provide feedback for the continuous evaluation of the effectiveness of the core curriculum.
  • To facilitate university and agency personnel in developing working relationships with one another.
Rehabilitation Agency Objectives
  • To provide the student with a comprehensive orientation program and instruction, including the agency expectations.
  • To influence the continued development of rehabilitation education programs.
  • To provide a practice experience requiring professional responsibility commensurate with the student's knowledge and experience.
  • To provide professional supervision and guidance to maximize the learning and growth experience.
  • To provide exposure to a number of varied rehabilitation issues and situations.
  • To provide the student with a realistic and representative experience of the duties performed by a full-time professional within the agency structure.

Back to Top

 

Internships

Internships are required for the MSPH degree in Community Health and for the MS degree in Rehabilitation. It is optional for other master's degree specializations in Community Health.

For the MSPH degree, students register in CHLH 485 Community Health Advanced Internship, and work for a minimum of 12 weeks (480 hours) in a University-approved agency or site. This is usually done during the first summer of residence. Working with their advisor and the course instructor, students plan an internship at a suitable site with a placement supervisor and draw up an agreement that incorporates the expectations of both student and internship site. Planning for the internship should begin at least one semester in advance of when the internship will be carried out. Please contact Dr. Susan Farner regarding the internship process.

For the MS in Rehabilitation, supervised field experience is an essential part of the degree. Depending on the concentration, students take one or two courses: REHB 583 Counseling Internship and REHB 585 Rehabilitation Practicum. All students complete REHB 585; students in the counseling and supported employment concentrations are required to complete both courses. Students in rehabilitation wishing to be eligible to sit the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) examination must accrue at least 700 hours of supervised internship. Students should consult their advisors and the Manual for Supervised Fieldwork in Rehabilitation Settings, available in the Department Office.

Back to Top

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Community Health

Admission Requirements

For admission into the PhD degree program applicants must have completed a master's degree with thesis. In addition to a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for the last 60 hours of their bachelor's degree work, they must have a grade point average of at least 3.6 on a 4.0 scale for their master's degree work, and acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The GRE test must have been taken within the last five years at time of application.

Applicants whose native language is not English, or who have not obtained a university degree from an institution in a country where the native language is English, must complete the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The Department of Community Health requires a minimum score of 600 on the paper-based test and 250 on the computer-based test for admission. In addition, if applicants whose native language is not English are seeking an assistantship they must also have taken the TOEFL within the last two years.

Procedures for Applying to Ph.D. after M.S. Work

See Procedures for Applying to Ph.D. after M.S. Work in Kinesiology section

PhD Program Description

Areas of Study

There are four areas of study in the doctoral program: epidemiology, health education, health policy and health services research and rehabilitation.

Objectives

Candidates for admission to the program will be required to possess a master's degree with thesis or equivalent, and to follow a course of study which will demonstrate:

  1. Substantial knowledge of the field of community health; including concepts, techniques, research, institutions, cultural and international variations, and history; and ability to apply this knowledge in a community health profession.
  2. Competency in one or more social sciences, epidemiology, and quantitative and qualitative research methods.
  3. In depth knowledge of one area of study in community health (epidemiology, health education, health policy, and health services research and rehabilitation), and in a related discipline.

The ultimate expression of a student's competence in the above consists of the doctoral dissertation. The dissertation, as evidence of a candidate's ability to identify, organize and execute a substantial piece of independent research, should constitute a significant contribution to knowledge, and demonstrate a high degree of writing skill.

Deficiencies

Before admission to the doctoral degree program, students will be advised if they will be required to take up to 12 hours of additional coursework to strengthen course experience lacking in their master's degrees. Areas of weakness will be determined by the Associate Head for Graduate Studies and interim advisor, and a suitable course program prescribed. The subject areas of concern are: public health, epidemiology, and quantitative and writing skills. Recommended courses could include: CHLH 429—Research Techniques, CHLH 474—Principles of Epidemiology, CHLH 510—Public Health Development, and CHLH 540—Health Behavior: Theory.

Doctoral Degree Requirements.

  1. Sixty-four (64) hours are required beyond the Master's degree.
  2. A student must complete the course requirements as determined by an individually planned program. In contrast to the master’s degree programs in Community Health, the doctoral program allows greater flexibility in the selection of courses to allow students to plan their coursework to best suit their research objectives.
  3. It is assumed that doctoral candidates will have completed a master’s degree in the health or disability field with coursework in public health, epidemiology, health behavior, health data analysis, and research and quantitative methods. Areas of weakness will be determined by the Graduate Program Coordinator and advisor and a suitable course program prescribed. Students may be required to take up to 12 hours of additional coursework to strengthen course experience lacking in their master’s degree.
  4. A minimum of 8 hours must be taken in an area of specialization, which may include courses from another department. Students are to choose these courses in consultation with their advisor.
  5. Competency in research methodology/statistics appropriate to the area of study is required. This competency is normally demonstrated by completion of 12 hours of research methods/statistics with a grade of B or better. Of these 12 hours, 8 must be at the 500-level (4 on advanced research methods, and 4 on advanced quantitative methodology). The remaining additional research methods/statistics coursework may be taken at the 400 or 500 level, and may focus on quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods.
  6. CHLH 591 (seminar, 1 hour) is required each semester.
  7. A minimum of 32 hours of dissertation research (CHLH 599) is required.
  8. Doctoral candidates must complete all requirements within seven years of their initial registration in the Graduate College. Candidates for the doctoral degree who have received a master's degree elsewhere, however, must complete their requirements within six years after their initial registration.

Summary: Doctor of Philosophy

Coming soon: Summary table of Doctor of Philosophy required courses

Note: Courses taken for the research tool option cannot be used to satisfy other course requirements in the doctoral program.

See the Doctoral Candidacy Review requirements

Examination and Candidacy Requirements for Doctoral Degrees in Kinesiology and Community Health

 

Doctoral Candidacy Review

A graduate student intending to pursue the Ph.D. degree in Kinesiology or Community Health must undergo an evaluation of progress as early in Stage II of graduate study as possible, but not before completing a minimum of 12 semester credit hours of coursework at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and no later than the end of the second year after entrance into the Graduate College. Candidates receiving the master’s degree at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign may be reviewed during the first semester following admission for doctoral study, and candidates entering the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with their master’s degree from another university may be reviewed during the second semester of enrollment. The review process is to result in a clear decision as to the student's progress, whether it is satisfactory or not, and the decision will be communicated to the student. Specific details regarding the review process are as follows:

The Review

Committee: The review committee is comprised of all graduate faculty members in the student's major area of study. The major areas include: Exercise Physiology; Biobehavioral Kinesiology; Cultural, Pedagogical & Interpretive Studies; Health Disparities & Disability; Public Health. The designated coordinator of each major area will conduct and supervise the doctoral candidacy reviews.

Scheduling Review: The coordinator will determine which students are to be reviewed each academic year and so notify them. The candidates will be informed as to the necessary materials to submit and following the submission of these materials, the coordinator will schedule the meeting times and places for the reviews.

Process: The review will consist of a meeting by the candidate with the committee which may be preceded by a written phase, if the committee so designates. The written phase will be directed to obtaining from the student information necessary to the meeting. Members of the committee, having reviewed all appropriate materials regarding the candidate, will, at the meeting, obtain additional information and discuss with the student any matters relevant to arriving at a decision.

Decisions Regarding Candidate's Progress

The committee's decision will fall into one of the three categories and will be relayed in writing to the student. Copies will go to the advisor, the student's file, the Graduate Program file, and to the Graduate College.

  • Satisfactory with no recommendations
  • Satisfactory but with recommendations
  • Unsatisfactory, and student is urged to re-assess program and goals
 
Basis for Decision

The following will be considered in arriving at the decision:

  • Scholastic ability indicated by such items as grade point average, course work, standardized test scores, advisor's statement, and letters of reference from others acquainted with the candidate's scholarly ability.
  • Basic understandings of the field of kinesiology and the inter-relationships between the various sub-areas constituting the field evidenced by the ability to present them clearly in written and oral form.
  • Professional maturity evidenced through professional experience, letters of reference, statement of career goals, and planned program of study toward the Ph.D. degree.
 
Materials Presented for Review
  • Curriculum vitae.
  • Transcripts of all course work taken in accredited institutions of higher learning including undergraduate GPA for last 60 hours of course work and GPA for graduate course work.
  • Master's thesis and/or other evidence of research experience.
  • GRE scores.
  • Written statement describing academic and career goals including research interests.
  • Detailed plan of doctoral program of study including all courses taken accompanied by grades, courses to be taken, and projected dissertation topic.
  • Three or more letters of reference, to include:
    • Advisor,
    • Faculty member at University of Illinois, other than advisor, acquainted with candidate's scholastic ability,
    • Faculty member familiar with student's work at master's degree level.
 
Follow Up

The coordinator, within approximately 14 days following the review, will communicate in writing to the student, the advisor and the Departmental Graduate Office the results of the meeting. If the committee has made specific recommendations regarding the student's course of study, the student will be expected to detail how he/she intends to fulfill the recommended actions. This response should be placed in the student's file in the Departmental Graduate Office. The student, if there are questions regarding the committee's recommendation, may, after consultation with the advisor address them to the coordinator of the committee in writing, and/or may request another meeting with the committee for discussion and clarification. This request must be received by the committee coordinator within two (2) weeks following transmittal of the decision to the student. The absence of any written communication from the student within the two-week time period will be considered as indicating acceptance of the decision and copies of the statement will be forwarded to the Departmental Graduate Office.

Doctoral Examinations

All Ph.D. candidates undergo two major examinations: (1) the Doctoral Preliminary Examination, which is taken at the end of Stage II of the doctoral program as signified by the successful completion of all course and language requirements; and, (2) the Final Oral Examination, which constitutes the candidate's public defense of a completed dissertation. The major purpose of the "preliminary examination" is to assess the candidate's readiness for commencing dissertation research, whereas the major purpose of the "final examination" is to assess whether the candidate has made a sound and substantial contribution to knowledge and is accordingly worthy of being granted a Ph.D.

Appointment of Committees

Doctoral Committees are appointed by the Dean of the Graduate College at the request of the departmental executive officer. Whenever possible, the membership of the doctoral committee which conducts the "preliminary examination", and the membership of the doctoral committee which guides the dissertation and conducts the "final examination" should be the same. The maximum allowable time between the preliminary and final examinations is five (5) years. If more time intervenes, then the candidate must demonstrate currency of knowledge by undergoing another preliminary examination.

The advisor, in consultation with the candidate, recommends the most appropriate faculty to serve on the candidate's doctoral committee and who is to serve as chairperson and principal director of the dissertation. The advisor (depending upon his/her particular graduate faculty status) may serve in one or both of these two roles. However, if the advisor is precluded (because of particular graduate faculty status) from serving in both roles, or if the advisor prefers not to serve on both roles, then with the approval of the candidate, another member of the committee can be recommended to serve as either chairperson or principal director of the dissertation.

The chairperson completes the Graduate College form for "Request for Appointment of Doctoral Committee" and submits to the departmental executive office for approval and signature. The form is then transmitted to the Dean of the Graduate College.

If the doctoral committee is properly constituted according to Graduate College requirement, then the Dean of the Graduate College notifies in writing the candidate, chairperson, committee members, and departmental executive officer of the committee's official appointment.

Committee Membership

The chairperson is responsible for all matters pertaining to scheduling, organizing, and administering the preliminary and final examinations. Arrangements must be made well in advance with the candidate and the committee members clearly informed of all relevant details, including the date, time and location of the examination.

The chairperson of a doctoral committee must be a member of the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health and of the Graduate Faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Those retired or resigned faculty members who continue on the Graduate Faculty, but who do not hold a current, zero or full-time appointment, may serve as a voting member of a doctoral committee, but may not chair.) The Director of Dissertation Research, if different from the chair, need not be a member of the Graduate Faculty. However, when possible, the Director of Dissertation research should be a member of the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health and the Graduate Faculty, and have chaired and supervised a master's thesis to completion, or have directed one independent study (i.e., KIN 590).

At least four voting members of the committee must be members of the Graduate Faculty, at least three of whom must be members of the Graduate Faculty and the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health; at least two must be tenured. One member should be from outside of the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health. If there are more than four voting members on the committee, at least half of the voting members should be members of the Graduate Faculty.

Individuals who are not members of the Graduate Faculty who will be voting members of the committee must be approved by the Dean of the Graduate College of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Emeritus members of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Graduate Faculty are also eligible to serve on doctoral committees.

Persons especially qualified to participate in a particular examination, from this University or elsewhere, may be appointed to any committee. A brief description of the person's or persons' qualifications should be included on the other side of the Request for Appointment of Doctoral Examination Committee form. The Graduate College and the Department defrays no expenses such appointments may incur.

A student's preliminary and final examination committees need not have the same composition or chair. It is suggested that a contingent chair be designated to serve in case the chair resigns, retires, or is otherwise not able to chair.

See Chapter 6 of the Graduate College Handbook for rules related to the composition of doctoral examination committees: http://www.grad.illinois.edu/gradhandbook/chaptervi/section04

Preliminary Doctoral Examination Overview

The objectives of the preliminary examination are fourfold, namely, to assess the candidate's: (1) general understanding of the disciplinary and professional aspects of kinesiology/community health; (2) knowledge of the literature and theoretical perspectives in his/her major area of study; (3) knowledge of the methodological perspectives and research techniques in his/her major area of study; and, (4) ability to integrate l, 2 and 3 in the design, preparation and oral defense of a dissertation proposal.

The preliminary examination is administered in two parts, an initial written examination followed, within 10 to 20 days, by an oral examination with the date of the orals constituting the official date of the examination. At the termination of the oral examination a decision will be reached by the committee as to whether the candidate passes the examination. The decision must be unanimous and may take one of three forms:

  • Pass: The candidate may proceed to Stage III, independent dissertation research.
  • Fail: The student may be granted another opportunity to take the examination after completing additional work. The Chair will inform the Graduate College if the student should be given a second examination.
  • Decision Deferred: The committee is temporarily adjourned, but intends to hold another examination within six (6) months, with the date included on the Certificate of Result.

If the Graduate College “is not informed of the result of the preliminary examination within six months after the scheduled examination date, the committee is considered dissolved. If the examination took place, but the committee failed to submit the results within six months, a petition must be submitted to the Graduate College requesting that the result be accepted from the committee after the 6-month deadline.”

Written Phase

The written examination is designed to assess, prior to the orals, the candidate's: (1) general understanding of the disciplinary and professional aspects of kinesiology/community health, (2) knowledge of the literature and theoretical perspectives in his/her major area of study; and, (3) knowledge of methodological perspectives and research techniques in his/her major area of study. Committee members may pose any questions they consider appropriate, but the chairperson is obligated to plan the examination to insure that the candidate has a sufficient understanding and knowledge, of each of the areas described above including the historical development and philosophical basis of the field of kinesiology/community health; an adequate knowledge of the principal concepts, propositions, models and theories of his/her area of study; and, an in-depth knowledge of the research literature relevant to his/her dissertation topic as well as research design and methodology appropriate to the area of dissertation research. If expertise is not available within the committee regarding all aspects of the examination, then the chairperson may solicit aid from experts outside the committee in formulating questions and evaluating responses. The evaluations by outsiders are collated and made available to the committee by the chairperson, but are not binding on the committee.

The chairperson contacts each committee member to discuss the format of the examination and to solicit appropriate questions. The chairperson has the responsibility of making sure that the candidate is carefully examined and that all aspects of the examination are adequately covered.

The candidate, following the chairperson's contact with committee members, should visit with each member to accomplish the following:

  • To discuss the general nature of the questions to be submitted and the source materials appropriate for review;
  • Give to each committee member a copy of his/her curriculum vitae, a written description of his/her program of graduate study, and a detailed description of proposed dissertation research.

The chairperson, upon completion of all arrangements (including evaluation format and procedures) notifies the committee as to the date(s) of the written examination and the date questions need to be received.

The candidate is given a set of questions for each of the three parts (see above) of the written examination and provided a suitable setting in which to write a given part of the examination. The candidate is allowed ample time (not to exceed 6 hours) in which to write each part of the examination.

The candidate, upon completion of a given set of questions, returns his/her answers to the chairperson and arranges a designated time to obtain the next set of questions. The examination may extend over more than one day, but not more than three days.

Upon completion of all parts of the written examination, the chairperson transmits copies of the candidate's answers to each committee member and requests that they submit their evaluation of each part of the examination to him/her within 3–5 days.

If the candidate fails two or more parts of the written examination, then the chairperson must, with the concurrence of the committee members, make one of two decisions:

  • Failure to pass with an opportunity to retake the written examination, or
  • Failure.

If the candidate fails only one part of the written examination then the chairperson must discuss his/her reservations with the candidate and request that the candidate either elect to follow through with the oral phase of the examination or elect to request a delay.

If the candidate elects to follow through with the oral phase of the examination, then one part of the oral examination must be addressed to the candidate's "weak performance" on the specific part of the written examination.

If the candidate elects to request a delay, then the chairperson declares the candidate not ready for the full preliminary examination in which case the examination, both written and oral phases, must be taken within six (6) months.

If the examination is not taken within six (6) months, then a request might be filed to reappoint the committee. Committees are automatically dissolved at the end of 6 months if a report of action has not been received by the Graduate College.

Oral Phase

The oral phase of the preliminary examination follows within 10-20 days of the written phase and typically does not exceed 4 hours. The chairperson notifies the committee of the date, time and location of the oral examination.

The first part of the oral examination focuses upon the candidate's written examination. Specifically, questions should be addressed to those parts of the written examination that committee members believe require further clarification. Such questions should reflect an in-depth probing of the candidate's understanding of any part of the written examination that was assessed as a failure or viewed as a weak performance.

The second part of the oral examination focuses upon the candidate's proposed dissertation topic. Each member of the committee must be provided an opportunity to examine the candidate thoroughly. All committee members must be satisfied that the candidate has a solid knowledge of the research literature and research methods related to his/her dissertation topic along with the scholarly abilities to satisfactorily complete a sound and substantial dissertation.

At the chairperson's discretion and in consultation with the committee and candidate, the oral phase of the preliminary examination may be administered in two parts with one segment dealing with the written examination phase and the other segment dealing with the proposed dissertation. If this procedure is adopted, then both parts of the oral examination must be completed with 30 days of the date formally set by the Graduate College for the Oral examination.

Upon completion of questioning, the candidate and any visitors are asked to leave the room while a decision is reached. A favorable decision of pass requires the assent of all committee members. The decision is recorded and the candidate is invited to return to the examining room. The committee chairperson informs the candidate of the decision and all necessary explanations are given.

The appropriate papers showing the results of the examination are forwarded immediately to the Departmental Graduate Office and the Associate Head for Graduate Studies. Copies of the candidate's written examination and its evaluation are placed in the candidate's permanent file in the Departmental Graduate Office.

Final Oral Examination

Overview

The final examination is scheduled upon completion of the dissertation and is oral and open to the public. The chairperson is responsible for arranging all matters pertaining to organizing, administering, and publicizing the examination. The examination shall be publicized by written announcement reported to the Associate Head for Graduate Studies three (3) weeks in advance. This announcement must give the candidate's name, title of dissertation, abstract of dissertation, and date, time and place of the candidate's dissertation defense. The Departmental Graduate Office will announce this information to all faculty members of the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health and other interested persons at least 10-14 days prior to the final examination.

General Procedure

The procedure for appointment of the final oral examination committee is, essentially, the same as that followed in appointing the preliminary examination committee. The chairperson, however, should contact each member of the preliminary committee to make certain that he/she is still available and willing to serve on the final examination committee.

The candidate, with the approval of the chairperson and/or principal director of the dissertation, submits the final typewritten draft of his/her dissertation to each committee member and consults each member regarding dates and times suitable for holding the dissertation defense. The final draft is defined as the draft to be presented for final typing and submission to the Dean of the Graduate College.

Each committee member must be given adequate time (a minimum of two (2) weeks) to review and evaluate the final draft of the dissertation.

The chairperson in consultation with the candidate initiates scheduling of the examination by completing the form "request for appointment of doctoral committee" and submits it to the Associate Head for Graduate Studies three (3) weeks prior to the proposed date of the final oral examination. The form is then transmitted to the Dean of the Graduate College.

If the doctoral committee is properly constituted, then the Dean of the Graduate College notifies in writing the candidate, chairperson, committee members, and Associate Head for Graduate Studies of the committee's official appointment and acceptance of the proposed date of examination.

Examination Format

The examination should proceed in an orderly fashion with the candidate first being given the opportunity to summarize his/her research. Each committee member then must be given ample time to examine the candidate. At the discretion of the chairperson, visitors may be permitted to address questions to the candidate.

Upon completion of the examination, the candidate and visitors are requested to leave the room. The committee then convenes to reach a decision regarding the acceptance or rejection of the dissertation. Finally, the candidate is asked to return to the room and is informed of the decision of the committee by the chairperson.

Appropriate forms are signed by the committee members and forwarded to the Departmental Graduate Office. The candidate has the right of appeal to the departmental executive officer or to the Dean of the Graduate College regarding the decision reached by the doctoral committee. Committee members must be prepared to support in writing their vote for acceptance or rejection of a dissertation, should circumstances require supporting evidence.

Submission of Dissertation
Format

The dissertation must conform to the style and format guidelines set forth by the Graduate College. These can be found at: http://www.grad.illinois.edu/graduate-college-thesis-requirements

Corrections

Upon acceptance of the dissertation the chairperson and/or principal director of dissertation consult with the candidate about any corrections that need to be made in the dissertation manuscript. Once these corrections (if any) are made, the chairperson transmits a copy of the final draft of the dissertation (as well as required abstracts) to the Associate Head for Graduate Studies.

Approval

The Associate Head for Graduate Studies will then forward the document to the Graduate Coordinator or his/her designate who then reads the dissertation and grants his/her approval in terms of style and format. If corrections are called for, then the dissertation is returned to the candidate and is resubmitted by him/her after said corrections are made. The Associate Head for Graduate Studies or his/her designate is given at least two (2) weeks to review a dissertation relative to style and format. When the Associate Head for Graduate Studies or his/her designate approves the dissertation in terms of style and format, it is then transmitted to the Department Head for his/her approval and signature (one to two weeks should be allowed for this last review). Then the dissertation is forwarded to the Graduate College for final review and approval.

Note: It is important to keep in mind when trying to schedule committee meetings and putting the final touches on your thesis, that faculty attend many conferences throughout the year and most faculty are on nine-month appointments and may not always be easily accessible during the summer. Thus, it is imperative that you work with your advisor and/or committee well in advance of any deadlines that you are trying to meet so that there is the least amount of disruption for all concerned.

Back to Top

PhD/MD Medical Scholars

The Department of Kinesiology and Community Health offers its PhD degree in combination with the MD degree under the Medical Scholars Program of the College of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign, University of Illinois at Chicago. Application to this program is made first to the College of Medicine. Admission to Kinesiology and Community Health is conditional upon admission to the Medical Scholars Program.

Admission

The application materials required by the Medical Scholars Program are used for application to the PhD program in Kinesiology and Community Health. A separate application is not necessary. The Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) test scores are used in lieu of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. However, for determination of financial aid it is recommended that applicants submit GRE scores. Applicants must have a grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for the last 60 hours of a completed bachelor's degree, and for any graduate work completed. Coursework for the MD degree will be recognized as equivalent to a master's degree. Candidates for admission are expected to have previous coursework or professional experience in public health, health education, health policy, epidemiology, quantitative analysis and writing skills. Areas of weakness will be determined by the Graduate Program Coordinator. Students will be advised before admission if they will be required to take additional coursework (up to 12 hours) to remedy deficiencies.

Requirements

The requirements for the PhD degree in Kinesiology and Community Health under the Medical Scholars Program are the same as for the regular PhD degree (see previous sections). Those students who have not completed a master's degree in Kinesiology and Community Health will be advised to complete courses that will prepare them for the preliminary examination. These could include:

  • CHLH 429—Research Techniques
  • CHLH 474—Principles of Epidemiology
  • CHLH 510—Public Health Development, and
  • CHLH 540—Health Behavior: Theory.

Back to Top